New Reference Guide Offers Quick Answers to Code Questions

Filed in Business Management, Codes and Standards by on June 8, 2016 4 Comments

code bookA new reference guide by NAHB and the International Code Council provides critical answers to the most frequently asked residential building code questions.

Available at BuilderBooks.com, the 2015 Home Builders’ Jobsite Codes is a convenient field guide to the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) and a quick reference that provides guidance on the most commonly asked questions about the building code that governs home building in many communities.

The guide, which features illustrations, tables and figures, is meant to be of practical use on the job site, but not as a substitute for the complete IRC.

The 2015 Home Builders’ Jobsite Codes discusses the impact of 2015 changes to codes that cover common walls separating townhouses, remodeling of an existing basement and more.

It also includes more than 100 detailed illustrations and useful tables and discussions about:

  • fire safety
  • energy efficiency
  • mechanical systems
  • foundations
  • safe and healthy living environments

The 2015 Home Builders’ Jobsite Codes is available in both print and e-book formats. For more information visit BuilderBooks.com (print) or ebooks.builderbooks.com (e-book).

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Comments (4)

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  1. Jeremiah Cuevas says:

    I am building an addition on a house that has balloon framing. Can I cut into exterior wall studs to install a ribbon support to support the ceiling joist of my proposed addition. Keeping in mind that the studs already support a ribbon support in the other side.

    • NAHB Now says:

      Jeremiah, you should consult a local building professional to better understand the codes in your area. Every state and locality adopts its own set of codes, so you will need to understand your local regulations.

  2. scott Giesen says:

    what is the code requirement using garage doors in a living space?

    • NAHB Now says:

      Scott, you should consult a local building professional to better understand the codes in your area. Every state and locality adopts its own set of codes, so you will need to understand your local regulations.

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