NAHB Podcast: Builders Should Drive Codes Development

Filed in Codes and Regulations, Economics by on November 22, 2019 1 Comment
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In the latest episode of the NAHB podcast Housing Developments, NAHB CEO Jerry Howard and Chief Lobbyist Jim Tobin discuss the building codes development process with guest Anne Anderson of Green Mountain Engineering, an NAHB member and a voting member of the International Codes Council.

The ICC is voting right now on the changes it will make to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the all-important International Residential Code (IRC). Anderson talks about the process of developing and adopting building code changes and how home builders are integral to the process. Codes can be problematic when builders aren’t involved.

NAHB Chief Economist Rob Dietz also joins the hosts to give an update on the current state of the economy and how it might impact the outcome of the 2020 elections.

Listen to the episode below, or wherever you find podcasts. A list of the podcast outlets with official Housing Developments feeds can be found at nahb.org/podcast.

Comments (1)

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  1. Henry J. Kelly Jr. says:

    My sense is the ICC can do better at having the increased cost of code proposals justified by the proponent. Ms. Anderson touched on the fact many proponents use the code adoption process to represent their industries. The fact is two of the major reasons we have so many code proposals each cycle and such an increase in cost attributable to code adoptions is manufacturers using the codes to sell products or gain market share over their competitors without benefit to homebuyers of additional health or safety. Additionally, government agencies use the codes to promote political agendas and have been doing so since hurricanes Hugo and Andrew hit south Florida in 1992. These factors and others like lack of available labor (as mentioned) substantially increase the cost of shelter and have resulted in a housing affordability crisis in the U.S.

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