How to Build a More Energy-Efficient Roof

Filed in Design, International Builders' Show, Remodelers by on December 5, 2016 0 Comments

One of the most important aspects of a home is often one of the most overlooked and underappreciated by its owner: the roof. That certainly isn’t the case for The New American Remodeled Home 2017 (TNARH).

In fact, the roof is likely to be one of the first things people will notice when they arrive at TNARH, set to be unveiled and open for tours Jan. 10-12 during the 2017 International Builders’ Show (IBS).

Roofers installing the white tiles on The New American Remodeled Home earlier this year.

Roofers installing the white tiles on The New American Remodeled Home earlier this year.

That’s because not many homes feature a white roof, but it’s all part of TNARH’s focus on high efficiency.

“Homes here in Florida want to reflect as much sunlight as possible, which is why we chose to make the roof white,” said Phil Kean, whose company is also wrapping up construction of The New American Home 2017 (TNAH). “This is the most energy [efficient] roof you can get, so we’re really excited about it.”

The white tiles create optimal light reflection to help lower the roof’s temperature, but it’s under those tiles where the weather-proofing system really shines.

Typical roof construction often mounts the battens directly to the roof which leaves little to no room for the tiles to breathe in high-heat conditions. Their lateral position can also cause a damming effect during heavy rains, leading to increased potential for leaks.

Small, plastic risers on the roof battens allow for improved air flow and water drainage.

Small, plastic risers on the roof battens allow for improved air flow and water drainage.

The TNARH roof features battens equipped with small, plastic, cup-like risers to keep them elevated off of the roof. This increases the air flow to help cool the tiles and allows rainwater to flow more easily down and off the roof.

Numerous green-building features – like these clever little batten risers – are found throughout the home. And they all add up to make it a whopping 75% more energy efficient than its original 1987 version.

All registered attendees of IBS will be eligible to tour TNARH and TNAH 2017, both of which are located in the same subdivision of the Lake Nona Golf & Country Club community. Complimentary shuttle bus tickets will be distributed each day at IBS on a first-come, first-served basis at The New American Home booth in the Hall C lobby of the Orange County Convention Center between 7:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.

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