3D-Printed House and Car to Be Displayed at IBS

The evolution of 3D-printing technology is continually finding new ways to impact not only how we live, but also what we live in.

Attendees at the 2016 NAHB International Builders’ Show in Las Vegas this January will get to experience what life would be like living in a 3D-printed home, which comes complete with a 3D-printed vehicle.

IBS will feature a display of the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration project, including a house and vehicle built using 3D-printing technology.

IBS will feature a display of the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration project, including a house and vehicle built using 3D-printing technology.

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) first unveiled the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration project less than two months ago. More than 20 collaborators were involved in the project, including the Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office and the architecture firm Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill.

Using the world’s largest 3D polymer printer, ORNL engineers built AMIE in less than one year and at a cost of more than $2 million. IBS 2016 will be the first time the home and vehicle will be displayed together outside of ORNL.

And unlike many previous examples of 3D-printed structures that came short of design, functionality and durability, AMIE boasts a combination of sturdy engineering with efficient energy use.

Some of its features include:

  • Modified atmosphere insulation panels that are seven times more energy efficient than traditional wall insulation
  • Micro-kitchen concept with a full suite of appliances
  • Rooftop solar photovoltaic system paired with used car batteries from a Fiat 500e to provide renewable power generation and storage

The vehicle, or as its creators call it, the “PUV” (Printed Utility Vehicle) isn’t just a fun accessory. It shares the same power source as the house. The bi-directional wireless power system enables the house to charge the vehicle’s battery and vice versa.

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory out for a test drive in the Printed Utility Vehicle.

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory out for a test drive in the Printed Utility Vehicle.

If the amount of stored solar energy gets low, the vehicle’s natural gas engine can power both it and the house. The vehicle tops out at around 60 mph, and its all-electric range lasts up to 35 miles of city driving.

AMIE’s creators believe 3D printing has the ability to revolutionize certain aspects of the building industry. Since each component can be produced to exact specifications, 3D printing can potentially reduce construction waste, use less material and produce more complex shapes to make the structure sturdier.

The team members are extremely proud of this achievement, but there’s already chatter about a Round 2. The next version would incorporate lessons learned from AMIE 1.0 and likely use a 3D-printing material more sustainable than carbon fiber.

Register to attend the 2016 IBS today to see the 3-D house, PUV, and other exhibits.

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  1. All the more reason to register early!
    Share this information with your employee associates, friends and associates locally, regionally, nationally and internationally!
    Let’s make this the best IBS ever!

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